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Shared Ministries - Black College Fund - FAQ

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Below are some frequently asked questions about the Black College Fund.  If you have additional questions, please contact us and we will try to answer.

How have the funds benefited the Historically Black Colleges and Universities?
How do churches support the Black College Fund?
What does Historically Black Colleges and Universities” mean?   
How do I apply for a scholarship?
How much money was remitted to the Black College Fund in the last three years?
Why should I attend a HBCU related to the United Methodist Church?  
Do other denominations support private HBCUs today?
What are the 11 United Methodist HBCUs?
Where can I order promotional resources for the Black College Fund?


Q. How have the funds benefited the Historically Black Colleges and Universities?

A. Capital expenditures—endowment building, construction and major renovations—comprise one-sixth of the funds. The colleges are often able to increase the value of these crucial capital funds by using them to secure need-based or matching grants from other resources. The remaining five sixths of the funds are used to bolster libraries, faculty development, academic research, student counseling and other services. This portion also underwrites some administrative and operations costs.

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Q. How do churches support the Black College Fund?

A. An apportionment is the shared responsibility of leadership at every level of the church—local, district and annual conference. Local churches send their apportioned gifts through annual conference treasurers to the General Council on Finance and Administration. From there, the gifts go to the office of the Black College Fund at the General Board of Higher Education and Ministry for distribution among the 11 institutions.

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Q. What does Historically Black Colleges and Universities” mean?

A. The term reflects the historical origin and mission of the schools and their predominant enrollment and cultural emphasis. For years, the U.S. Department of Education designated colleges and universities as “White” and “Negro,” based on their majority population. The department now uses the term “historically Black colleges and universities” (HBCUs). Today Asian, Hispanic, white and international students are enrolling in increasing numbers.

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Q. How do I apply for a scholarship?

A. The Black College Fund does not offer scholarships in the traditional sense. Lina H. McCord Interns are paid through scholarships, which are funded through the Black College Fund.  However, those are the only scholarships provided through the Black College Fund.

The Black College Fund provides the institutions with the finance so that their students will have successful college experiences. You can apply for a loan and or a scholarship through our loans and scholarship office of the General Board of Higher Education and Ministry.

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Q. How much money was remitted to the Black College Fund in the last three years?

A. In 2012, $9,439,938 was remitted, In 2011, $9,574,395 was remitted and in 2010, $9,514,894 was remitted.

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Q. Why should I attend a HBCU related to the United Methodist Church?

A. United Methodist-related HBCUs support and nurture leadership for life:

  • exciting courses, events, relationships and activities that offer a vibrant and spiritual environment, which encourages pride and self-esteem in the accomplishments of African Americans;
  • the opportunity to team up with academic staff who serve as strong cultural and spiritual mentors or counselors;
  • preparation and training with the 21st century in mind, emphasizing and anticipating a global and technological society;
  • educational emphasis on academic excellence, community service and social responsibility; and
  • guidance and training enabling students to maximize their gifts and potential.

In addition to these experiences and contributions, students benefit from relatively low tuition rates.

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Q. Do other denominations support private HBCUs today?

A. Several religious denominations, including others of Methodist origin, support private Historically Black Colleges and Universities. The United Methodist Church, however, supports the largest number of fully accredited HBCUs in the United States.

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Q. What are the 11 United Methodist HBCUs?

 

Bennett College
Greensboro, NC
www.bennett.edu

Bethune-Cookman University
Daytona Beach, FL
www.bethune.cookman.edu

   Claflin University
   Orangeburg, SC
   www.claflin.edu

Clark Atlanta University
Atlanta, GA
www.cau.edu

Dillard University
New Orleans, LA
www.dillard.edu

   Huston-Tillotson University 
   Austin, TX
   http://www.htu.edu/

Meharry Medical College
Nashville, TN
www.mmc.edu

Paine College
Augusta, GA
www.paine.edu

   Philander Smith College
   Little Rock, AR
   www.philander.edu

Rust College
Holly Springs, MS
www.rustcollege.edu

Wiley College
Marshall, TX
www.wiley.edu

Q. Where can I order promotional resources for the Black College Fund?
Follow this link to order free promotional resources for the Black CollegeFund.

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Contact

The Black College Fund
General Board of Higher Education and Ministry
The United Methodist Church
PO Box 340007
Nashville, TN 37203-0007

615-340-7378 office
615-340-7379 fax
bcfumc@gbhem.org
http://www.gbhem.org/bcf